FINA permit wearable technology in swim races

FINA permit wearable technology in swim races

The World’s aquatic governing body has announced that swimmers will now be able to wear technology during swimming races.

“The use of technology and automated data collection devices is permissible for the sole purpose of collecting data. Automated devices shall not be utilized to transmit data, sounds, or signals to the swimmer and may not be used to aid their speed.”

This means it will be legal to “wear” technology to collect the swimmer’s data for research, education, and entertainment However, that data cannot be used in real-time to inform swimmers on how they are going, nor assist them with communication throughout the race.

The impact of this FINA rule change will impact the sport for a generation. A positive outcome is that feedback will be provided on swimmers performance in real time to their coach and potentially the public. But will the top swimmers want to wear the technology, particularly if the data is shared through tv coverage and to others?

To look at how this can work and the outcomes for the sport, let’s take a look.

Take Your Coaching to Another Level

Take Your Coaching to Another Level

Over the next four months we are going to provide all swimming coaches with some gold.

Not real gold, but golden ideas to assist swim coaches to better understand two key aspects of coaching which many coaches find difficult to understand. They will be explained in live sessions where you can ask questions until you fully understand and can utilise every aspect in your coaching.

Think of it as a crash course on everything you want to better understand to take your coaching to another level. This is a golden opportunity to increase your knowledge to become a better informed and more successful swim coach.

And if you are keen to improve your coaching, please read right to the bottom of this post to take advantage of our special offer. This is your opportunity to get in at the ground floor.

The program has now begun and you will get access to any sessions that have already been recorded. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to take your coaching to another level.

We have put together responses to some of the most commonly asked questions that swim coaches have. These include:

 How do I prepare a seasonal plan and then weekly plan for my squad/s?

  • How do I write workout designs effectively?
  • How do the energy systems work?
  • How do I know what the right training intensities are for my swimmers?
  • Why should I be preparing my swimmers for 200m events?

We will answer all these and more in…

 

The School of Physiology for Training and Planning for Swimming Performance

Physiology of Training for Competition Swimmers

Coaches will be hand-led through the minefield that is understanding the physiology of training. By the end you will fully understand the terminology and practical application around training principles, energy systems, progressive overload and much more.

These sessions are all included as part of our world-wide coaching program, Swim Coach Advantage. The following topics will be explained in an easy to understand way that will help you improve your coaching.

  • Training principles, training zones, training variables & training specifics
  • Overload & progressive overload
  • Understanding energy systems, energy systems and events, energy systems and training design
  • Aerobic & anaerobic
  • Lactate production, lactate clearance & lactate tolerance
  • Aerobic threshold & anaerobic threshold
  • VO2 Max – Maximum O2 Uptake
  • Anaerobic Glycolysis
  • Muscle fuel – ATP, ATP-PC
  • Lactic acid & lactate curve
  • Heart rate & heart rate curve
  • Recovery

Planning for Competition Swimmers

You will also be provided with a step by step guide to assist you with your seasonal planning, weekly planning and workout design. This includes:

  • Seasonal planning for Juniors and Advanced Juniors
  • Seasonal Planning for Age and Youth Performance
  • Training Intensities, weekly planning and workout design for advanced juniors
  • Preparation Planning for Age and Youth Performance
  • Weekly Planning and Weekly Periodisation for Age and Youth Performance
  • Importance of Preparing for 200m events
  • Considerations for race preparation and Tapering for peak performance

These sessions are only for current members of Swim Coach Advantage.

Your Presenter

The presentation and delivery of the content above will be led by 2004 & 2012 Australian Olympic Swim Team Head Coach, Leigh Nugent. “Nugget” as he is affectionally known around the swimming traps, will deliver the key components above and will be supported by a number of guest contributors including Australia’s next Head Coach Rohan Taylor and a physiologist.

Special Offer

As a new member to Swim Coach Advantage, you will also receive 12 months access to:

  • More than 200 stroke drill videos
  • Weekly swim observations from experienced coaches
  • The Coaching Junior Swimmers certificate program
  • The weekly Mentor PODs which are held live each week (and recorded for viewing later if you miss them)
  • The Swim Parent Advantage program – see, read and watch all the information provided to swim parents
  • A coaching network of like-minded coaches who want to learn and develop their coaching knowledge and skills

Take advantage of our special offer. This offer is time sensitive. Join by Sunday 13 September 2020 and you can use the Coupon Code “ASCTA” and receive $50.00 off the yearly price.

This program will begin on Thursday 27 August 2020. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to take your coaching to another level.

See more at Swim Coach Advantage.

Parent Patience Required as Pools Re-Open

Parent Patience Required as Pools Re-Open

For a majority of parents and swimmers, the pending re-opening of swimming pools around Australia and in many other countries is a big step back to re-gaining some normality in their life. The announcements that pools can re-open under strict guidelines have started. The swimming bags are packed, training equipment has been disinfected and all we are waiting for now is the email or message from the coach to say “we start back on this day”.

But for many, the celebrations will go on hold very quickly as aquatic facilities, program managers and swim coaches work through the logistics of the restrictions placed upon them if they re-open. Many are waiting for public health orders to even be allowed to open and others are preparing their COVID-19 safety guidelines and procedures for their operations.

Most aquatic facilities will re-open when it is safe and financially viable to do so. This will not necessarily be the date that has been publicly provided by government leaders. If it is financially and operationally viable to open the pool, facility managers will then need to decide who can utilise the pool. If numbers are restricted, many Councils will use a booking system for lap swimming and it is unlikely that squads will be allowed to swim as the community may take up all the places.

Club’s will need to work through with the facility operators to secure pool space at a reasonable rate and be on the same page in regards to policies, procedures and guidelines around the health and safety of all users.

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Our new program Swim Parent Advantage has weekly posts and fortnightly Parent PODs on Zoom where parents enjoy asking questions, sharing ideas and educating themselves on competitive swimming. Led by former Australian Head Coach Leigh Nugent, Olympic Gold Medal coach Rohan Taylor and experienced aquatic educator Gary Barclay, this program is the first of its kind in the world. Membership is now open for all parents of competitive swimmers.

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For many clubs or programs, starting squads back with limited numbers allowed in the water at any one time will create issues around the financial viability of the program. Low user numbers will mean low income – if groups are limited to 10 or even 20, income will be limited. The aim for each program must be to break-even in most situations. A return to the pool may be cost prohibitive. Clubs and program operators cannot afford to run at a loss so they may have to make a hard decision and not start back until the restrictions on numbers have been eased. Charges to families may also be higher due to small numbers.

In many cases, squads will not look the same. Coaches will have to group swimmers by the numbers permitted and that group will train together whenever they train. By doing this, it is easy to recognise which swimmers or families may have been exposed to coronavirus if someone was unfortunate enough to get it within that group. They will also know that members of each group should not have been in contact with each other, at least at the facility.

Coaches will then have to decide which swimmers can come back to training. This decision will invariably depend on the numbers allowed in the pool, the number of lanes available, the number of swimmers allowed in each lane and the length of time the pool is available. This will vary from club to club however what we do know is that it will not be the same as normal.

Many clubs will choose to bring an older group of swimmers in first. These athletes will be more likely to follow social distancing guidelines and will be able to raise any concerns they have with the coaches and facility so that improved steps can be implemented before younger swimmers return. They will also be good role models when more participants are allowed to attend the pool. Talking last week with a leading coach in a high profile program, he explained that swimmers training 8 times a week for 2 hours have ‘missed’ the equivalent of 128 hours of training in the last 8 weeks. Swimmers who train 3 times a week for 1 1/2 hours have ‘missed’ the equivalent of 36 hours of training. It is therefore much more important for the older more accomplished swimmers to be the first groups back into the pool and then other age groups can re-join over time. It may take 12 to 16 weeks before all squads are back in the water on a regular basis.

What I can say is that I haven’t spoken with a coach yet who is not keen to get everyone back ASAP, and I encourage parents of swimmers who may not be invited back to the pool immediately or are offered a very reduced session load, to remain supportive of the club, program and coaches. When squads return they may initially have reduced time, for example 45min session and then have 5-10 minutes to pack up and leave the centre, before the next group enters and is in the pool 5 minutes later for their 45min session. This may happen multiple times each morning and night.

So, while governments and those in authority make announcements around pools re-opening, facility managers, pool operators, clubs and coaches may have many other issues to consider before everything is back to normal. Parents and swimmers will have to be patient…. just for a little bit longer.

Breaststroke Pull

Breaststroke Pull

I am in the very fortunate position of visiting many coaching programs around Australia.  These range from high performance programs to small country and metropolitan programs. During my visits, I like to take the opportunity to observe the various levels of teaching and coaching being conducted which support the development pathway for swimmers to the highest performing squad. It has become very obvious to me that there are many interpretations on how the breaststroke pull is performed and as a consequence how it is taught. (more…)